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Question for Canadians


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What province or provinces do you consider to be in "Central Canada:".  This is a surprisingly heated discussion among some of my friends and I'm interested in your take.

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The ones in the middle.  Not to far to the east and not too far to the west.

 

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1 minute ago, Kzoo said:

The ones in the middle.  Not to far to the east and not too far to the west.

 

Yep - if they touch an ocean, they ain't "central".

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1 minute ago, jsharr said:

Utah

Good answer.  Much better that that excuse @Philander Seabury gave - not being a Canadian and not being able to read a map and not having a tv that works...

What a bunch of excuses.

 

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1 minute ago, Kzoo said:

Good answer.  Much better that that excuse @Philander Seabury gave - not being a Canadian and not being able to read a map and not having a tv that works...

What a bunch of excuses.

 

I have a big screen tv and can do a wicked good Doug and Bob impersonation.

take off you hosehead!  eh.

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10 minutes ago, jsharr said:

I have a big screen tv and can do a wicked good Doug and Bob impersonation.

take off you hosehead!  eh.

That right there is why I always listen to you.

 

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It depends on where you are from.  Technically Manitoba is the geographic centre of Canada, but growing up out east, the term 'Central Canada' means Quebec and Ontario.  For years they were the economic centre of the country, and if you group those two together, there are 4 Provinces to the East of them and 4 Provinces to the West of them.

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4 minutes ago, Zephyr said:

It depends on where you are from.  Technically Manitoba is the geographic centre of Canada, but growing up out east, the term 'Central Canada' means Quebec and Ontario.  For years they were the economic centre of the country, and if you group those two together, there are 4 Provinces to the East of them and 4 Provinces to the West of them.

You Kanadians are konfusing.  I like the Utah answer best.

 

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5 minutes ago, Zephyr said:

It depends on where you are from.  Technically Manitoba is the geographic centre of Canada, but growing up out east, the term 'Central Canada' means Quebec and Ontario.  For years they were the economic centre of the country, and if you group those two together, there are 4 Provinces to the East of them and 4 Provinces to the West of them.

Ontario and Quebec seemed to be the answer from most of the Canadians in the other discussion.  Your comment about 4 to the east and west makes sense, they just said "that's Central Canada because that's what those provinces are called".

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2 hours ago, Zephyr said:

It depends on where you are from.  Technically Manitoba is the geographic centre of Canada, but growing up out east, the term 'Central Canada' means Quebec and Ontario.  For years they were the economic centre of the country, and if you group those two together, there are 4 Provinces to the East of them and 4 Provinces to the West of them.

I would agree with Zephyr...Manitoba is more associated with the prairies, given its history, economic drivers and cultural differences.

As far as the economic strength of Ontario...for sure.  I lived and worked there..latter for over 2 decades.   I haven't spent time looking at Quebec. It's hard to think of economic strength when a huge hunk of some provinces is wilderness so therefore either some exploitable natural resources going on or it's just plain wilderness/bog/rock/mountain/lakes etc.  

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I would say Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but I think of Ontario mostly in the context of Toronto being just north east of me, and forget how far west it extends.

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46 minutes ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

I would say Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but I think of Ontario mostly in the context of Toronto being just north east of me, and forget how far west it extends.

Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are considered by Canadians as more prairie provinces.  There are huge tracts of ranchland and farmland in a scale that's not found in either Ontario, Quebec. True, there are mountains in Alberta right by the British Columbia border, still it's more prairie in terms of the soil, vegetation, climate, temperatures, and some of the animals that are found in prairies don't exist at all or not as many: ie. wild bison, prairie dogs (little groundhogs), pronghorn (which I didn't even know about until I moved from Vancouver) a kind of prairie antelope, etc.

https://cyclewriteblog.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/looking-into-canadas-soul-part-i-freaking-out-over-vast-time-distance-and-climatic-toughness/

Click into image below to see it bigger.  I made this infographic for my blog a few years ago.  It was lots of fun.  Yes, I've lived in Ontario (40+ yrs.), Vancouver (8 yrs. and planning more years), 10 years in Alberta.

3-cities-2.png?w=1000

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15 minutes ago, shootingstar said:

Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are considered by Canadians as more prairie provinces.

In my American brain, this is “central”, like the US Midwest running from Ohio to Colorado.

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4 hours ago, Further said:

Is the question about geography

I'm going for geography....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_of_Canada#:~:text=There is a sign on,(including Newfoundland since 1949).

It looks cold at the center of Canada.

1024px-Centre_of_Canada_Longitude.jpg

Sign on the Trans-Canada Highway near Winnipeg, marking the longitude centre of Canada

 

If you use the latitude and longitude from the web page.

image.thumb.png.5f42b7dcbe95b549bd2e26b16a1f7c7f.png

 

So yes.... Salt Lake City looks like the correct answer.

 

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Has it always been called “Nunavat”? Was it something else prior that got renamed, or was it just part of the NWT? Because I don’t recall learning of it as a Province growing up.

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18 minutes ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

Has it always been called “Nunavat”? Was it something else prior that got renamed, or was it just part of the NWT? Because I don’t recall learning of it as a Province growing up.

It’s snot a province, is it?  A territory?
Oh, it was split off from the northwest territory in 1999. 
 

 

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38 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:
52 minutes ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

 

It’s snot a province, is it?  A territory?

Correct. So... I don’t recall learning of it when we studied about Provinces and Territories in school. Which now makes sense as I graduated before 1999. But, was it called something else before, or just part of the NWT?

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Did you know it was Mexico that made the US abandon efforts to take Vancouver? And it was an edict by Tsar Alexander I that resulted in Alaska having coastland so far south?

American Empire expansionists called for the annexation of the entire region up to Parallel 54°40′ north, the southern limit of Russian Americaas established by parallel treaties between the Russian Empire and the United States (1824) and Britain (1825). However, after the outbreak of the Mexican–American War in April 1846 diverted U.S. attention and military resources, a compromise was reached in the ongoing negotiations in Washington

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11 hours ago, Further said:

Is the question about geography or economy ? 

It started as a question regarding convenience. - trying to find a location that was "convenient" or "centrally located" for a group of people spread across Canada .  But then it ventured into a more theoretical discussion similar to the "what is the US midwest and does it include Ohio" discussion that people in the US often have which can depend on a variety of factors. 

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3 hours ago, Prophet Zacharia said:

Has it always been called “Nunavat”? Was it something else prior that got renamed, or was it just part of the NWT? Because I don’t recall learning of it as a Province growing up.

It was part of the Northwest Territories until 1999, when they divided NWT and the west section remain NWT and the east portion was set up as a brand new territory called Nunavut

57 minutes ago, Kirby said:

It started as a question regarding convenience. - trying to find a location that was "convenient" or "centrally located" for a group of people spread across Canada .  But then it ventured into a more theoretical discussion similar to the "what is the US midwest and does it include Ohio" discussion that people in the US often have which can depend on a variety of factors. 

Because Canada is so remote, central is not necessarily the the best place to meet up.  For example there are a lot more choices to get into Toronto than into Winnipeg.

Like the 'Midwest', Canada has generalized regions.  The Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI), the Atlantic Provinces (the Maritimes plus Newfoundland and Labrador), Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario),  the Prairies (Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta) and the West (BC) although people from the east tend to group Alberta as part of the 'West' instead of the Prairies and people from the west tend to use Maritimes and Atlantic Provinces interchangeably

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35 minutes ago, Zephyr said:

Because Canada is so remote, central is not necessarily the the best place to meet up.  For example there are a lot more choices to get into Toronto than into Winnipeg.

 

:lol:B)  Geez, Canada really is a cast-off in the middle of nowhere.  The whole big huge country.. :speedy:  Alot of folks internationally may see Canada that way if they've never visited nor read about its history, economy:  1 big huge blob with maybe beauty of west coast/Vancouver (because 2010 Olympics revealed to the world what that part of Canada looks like), smattering of the French in that huge blog province of Quebec, etc.

35 minutes ago, Zephyr said:

Like the 'Midwest', Canada has generalized regions.  The Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI), the Atlantic Provinces (the Maritimes plus Newfoundland and Labrador), Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario),  the Prairies (Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta) and the West (BC) although people from the east tend to group Alberta as part of the 'West' instead of the Prairies and people from the west tend to use Maritimes and Atlantic Provinces interchangeably

When one lives in Alberta after living in Ontario for many years, and then living in Vancouver (where I still go back to live), one realizes how wierd it is to lump B.C. and Alberta as the west.  There are VERY different psychological differences between long-term residents in B.C. and Alberta. The politics, economics, climate, etc. of Alberta is closer to the other prairie provinces.

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1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

living in Vancouver (where I still go back to live), one realizes how wierd it is to lump B.C. and Alberta as the west

But for someone from the East it is weird to hear people from out here (yourself included) refer to Ontario as the 'East'.

During the east coast out migration of workers in the late 70's, early 80's, people went to Central Canada to work in factories, went to the Prairies (MB, SK) if they were looking to work agriculture and they were said to be going 'to the west' (Alberta BC) if they were going to work either in oil and gas or forestry.  Probabaly because patch workers and tree planters moved between the northern half of both provinces faurly frequently

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2 hours ago, Zephyr said:

But for someone from the East it is weird to hear people from out here (yourself included) refer to Ontario as the 'East'.

During the east coast out migration of workers in the late 70's, early 80's, people went to Central Canada to work in factories, went to the Prairies (MB, SK) if they were looking to work agriculture and they were said to be going 'to the west' (Alberta BC) if they were going to work either in oil and gas or forestry.  Probabaly because patch workers and tree planters moved between the northern half of both provinces faurly frequently

In terms of east, it is direction from Alberta or Vancouver, when i refer to Ontario when talking to Albertans.  Here, it's easier to say Maritimes, so locals know the exact region of Canada.

Ontario to many long time Albertans, seems mysterious and unrelatable ...to many folks here.  I'm not sure why.  Especially those who have never lived in any other province at all.  They see Toronto as some sort of urban hell-hole....which is wrong.

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