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Can We Put This Controversy To Bed?


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The first example listed in the listing is generally the generally accepted version, generally speaking.  Notice that both examples have the same pronunciation you your question is moot in the verbal context.  See what I did there?

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48 minutes ago, Philander Seabury said:

I like rooves

I was going to say the same about hooves. So I will.

I life hooves.  It was a more rounded sound than hoofs.

Is it an onomatopoeic word where the name comes from the sound of the hoofed-animals hooves slapping the ground?

I bet it is.  So what sound more life a running bull, horse, etc., hoofs or hooves?

If we're stuck with hoof as the singular maybe "hoofs" makes more sense: one less complication of our illogical naming system like mouse and mice.

OK, I like hooves better but only if we change hoof to hoove.

 

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1 minute ago, MickinMD said:

I life hooves.  It was a more rounded sound than hoofs.

Hey.  Did you miss this part or just ignore what I wrote.  Go ahead, you can be honest.  You won't hurt my feelings.

 

10 minutes ago, Kzoo said:

Notice that both examples have the same pronunciation...

 

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11 minutes ago, roadsue said:

Without researching the origin language, I’m just saying “cloven hooves” is high poetry; whereas “cloven hoofs” is lowlands talk.

@maddmaxx I get the reaction. Language  and power are closely entwined. English changes when the powers change, when invading forces and monarchy, the wealthy and heeled take control.

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3 minutes ago, roadsue said:

@maddmaxx I get the reaction. Language  and power are closely entwined. English changes when the powers change, when invading forces and monarchy, the wealthy and heeled take control.

I was quite envious of a great answer to the thread.  I am and always will be an instrument technician when serious thinking about the English language is involved.  That's a fair translation of "I are an engineer".

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1 hour ago, roadsue said:

@maddmaxx I get the reaction. Language  and power are closely entwined. English changes when the powers change, when invading forces and monarchy, the wealthy and heeled take control.

Keep propping up the old regime :(  Trying to go forward by going backward is never my first choice!

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