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Have you ever attended a spiritual center?


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Have you ever visited a spiritual center?  

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  1. 1. Have you ever visited a spiritual center?

    • Yes
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    • No
      5


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3 minutes ago, Square Wheels said:

Yes and no.  Not sure if Buddhism is considered spiritual, but I spent a long weekend at the Kripalu Center in western MA.  No practice of Buddhism at all, none.  

What did you think? I mean about the experience...

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3 minutes ago, bikeman564™ said:

what is a spiritual center?

In this case, I'm referring to anything independent of the major religions.  But the place I'm considering is an Ernest Holmes promoting Religious Science.  Just to explore...

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...I think that as long as you are careful, and have a good feel for who the crazies might be in your chosen "center", there are (as they say) many spokes on the wheel.  But you can get into big trouble trying to apply the principles of science, as known in the 1920's and 1930's, to spiritual pursuits and the existence of a "god".  Generally, all of this stuff is fundamentally faith based.  When you start trying to science it, there are a million ways you can get lost.

 

In the 1920s, Holmes published the following statement of beliefs:[15]

  • I believe in God, the Living Spirit Almighty; one, indestructible, absolute and self-existent Cause. This One manifests itself in and through all creation, but is not absorbed by its creation. The manifest universe is the body of God; it is the logical and necessary outcome of the infinite self-knowingness of God.
  • I believe in the incarnation of the Spirit in all, and that we are all incarnations of the One Spirit. I believe in the eternality, the immortality, and the continuity of the individual soul, forever and ever expanding.
  • I believe that Heaven is within me and that I experience It to the degree that I become conscious of it.
  • I believe the ultimate goal of life to be a complete emancipation from all discord of every nature, and that this goal is sure to be attained by all.
  • I believe in the unity of all life, and that the highest God and the innermost God is one God.
  • I believe that God is personal to all who feel this indwelling Presence.
  • I believe in the direct revelation of Truth through my intuitive and spiritual nature, and that anyone may become a revealer of Truth who lives in close contact with the indwelling God.
  • I believe that the Universal Spirit, which is God, operates through a Universal Mind, which is the Law of God; and that I am surrounded by this Creative Mind which receives the direct impress of my thought and acts upon it.
  • I believe in the healing of the sick through the power of the Mind. I believe in the control of conditions through the power of the Mind. I believe in the eternal Goodness, the eternal Loving-kindness and the eternal Givingness of Life to all.
  • I believe in my own soul, my own spirit, and my own destiny; for I understand that the life I live is God. Amen. And So It Is.
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Holmes
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No, I just walk into churches/cathedrals, temples.

That said, there are certain faiths I would tend to gravitate.

But before I go there, it's useful to know 1 religion in a general way so when walks into its place of worship, it might help to figure out what you are looking at. I have an interest in  stained glass liturgical art and so I have gone into the great cathedrals in the European cities over the years. 

It's harder for me to feel any sense of peace when an existing religion is very patriarchical..like Shintoism. It left me distant cold, when we went into some Shinto temples in Japan.

Buddhism has its own rigour... still to me patriarchical. Maybe that's the problem going into the temples that are centuries-old in Asia. 

So I guess I'm very boring:  1 of the established more progressive churches  that is strong in social justice and working directly at the community level.

I see a  religious place as a place of refuge  that should be safe for a person, to reflect inward as well as outward. I wouldn't call it peace all the time in this reflection. 

                     

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7 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...also, a lot of these "spiritual center" places have donuts. You have been warned.

The food at the Kripalu was amazing.  Yup, lots of donuts.  LOTS of really healthful food and lots of vegan / gluten-free options.  I ate well while there.

They had a large section of eating where talking is not allowed.  Large tables, so things like, "Do you mind if I sit with you..." aren't said.  I went with my wife.  Odd to sit and eat togehter and not talk.

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14 minutes ago, Page Turner said:

...also, a lot of these "spiritual center" places have donuts. You have been warned.

This is no salvation in donuts.  Believe me, I've tried.  Coffee on the other hand??  I'm open to it.

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So going to back to sleep is a spiritual experience.  Waking back up thinking about coffee is a spiritual experience.  When I actually have my first cup of coffee -- it could be orgasmic as i await in anticipation.

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1 hour ago, shootingstar said:

No, I just walk into churches/cathedrals, temples.

That said, there are certain faiths I would tend to gravitate.

But before I go there, it's useful to know 1 religion in a general way so when walks into its place of worship, it might help to figure out what you are looking at. I have an interest in  stained glass liturgical art and so I have gone into the great cathedrals in the European cities over the years. 

It's harder for me to feel any sense of peace when an existing religion is very patriarchical..like Shintoism. It left me distant cold, when we went into some Shinto temples in Japan.

Buddhism has its own rigour... still to me patriarchical. Maybe that's the problem going into the temples that are centuries-old in Asia. 

So I guess I'm very boring:  1 of the established more progressive churches  that is strong in social justice and working directly at the community level.

I see a  religious place as a place of refuge  that should be safe for a person, to reflect inward as well as outward. I wouldn't call it peace all the time in this reflection. 

                     

I don't know if I consider Temples and Shrines the same as the spiritual center referenced in the OP.  The experience in Japan depended on the level of tourism.  Todi Ji and Kiyomizu Dera were very crowded with tourists and while impressive they did not seem to have the special presence that the emperor's shrine in Kashihara or Chion-in in Kyoto had when there were few people around.  At Kashihara Jingu I felt like the entire structure was designed to bring my focus front and center when I stepped up to the prayer rail and prepared to clap my hands for attention.

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1 hour ago, maddmaxx said:

It's like an internet cafe but with ouija boards and mediums.

I know this is a joke -- I believe -- and a darn good one.  But spiritual centers are for more than this. They don't have the straight jackets bound by many of the major religions.  They tend to deal with matters of the heart and existential matters and can help with life balance -- at least that's my hope.

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I went to a day long session at the Baaken center for healing and spirituality at the U of M a few years ago..it was on meditation..I was expecting more of a how to...instead it was pretty much 6 hours of meditation 1 hour of mindfulness lunch..no talking and maybe 1 hour of give and take and instructions in the course of the day. 

I also one did a silent retreat...thinking about something like that again :nodhead:

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Of course biking season is here and that can solve most these problems.  But I like to ride on my own or with my wife and do my own thing so it doesn't help much with the social aspect.  And this covid crap has certainly reduced my social realm.  I work from home, I just moved to a new area, my old man is on his last legs, and covid's busted out.  Yeah, I'm feeling isolated.

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